Certain factors put individuals at greater risk of victimization by an intimate partner, such as substance use, seeing or being a victim of violence as a child, and experiencing stressful life events, e.g., financial hardship or unemployment (1). In addition, students who reported feeling less connected to their schools more often reported dating violence. S., with an estimated 1 in 3 young people ages 14-20 reporting they have experienced dating violence (4).

For teen dating violence, additional risk factors include family conflict, depression/anxiety, believing that violence is acceptable, associating with delinquent peers, aggressive behavior, lacking coping skills, and lacking support at home, in school, and in the community (4, 6). Witnessing domestic violence as a child can have harmful, long-term emotional, behavioral, and physical health consequences (1, 2, 3). A multitude of systems and services address aspects of this problem, though they have not always worked collaboratively or focused on the same goals (1). Child exposure to parental violence and psychological distress associated with delayed milestones.

Witnessing violence has been associated with decreased school attendance and academic performance. The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report.

Further, teenage victims of dating violence are more likely than their non-abused peers to smoke, use drugs, engage in unhealthy dieting (e.g., taking diet pills or laxatives, vomiting to lose weight), engage in risky sexual behaviors, and attempt or consider suicide. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Intervening with adolescents experiencing dating violence is crucial to prevent adult intimate partner violence.

Singh and his colleagues at the U-M Injury Center analyzed data from a larger survey of teens and young adults aged 14 to 20 years who visited the U-M Health System’s emergency department for any reason between late 2010 and early 2013.

— Dating during the teen years takes a violent turn for nearly 1 in 6 young people, a new study finds, with both genders reporting acts like punching, pulling hair, shoving, and throwing things.

The startling number, drawn from a University of Michigan Medical School survey of more than 4,000 adolescent patients ages 14 to 20 seeking emergency care, indicates that dating violence is common and affects both genders.Relationship violence occurs in an estimated 3 to 17 percent of all pregnancies in the United States (7). Department of Education, Office of Safe and Healthy Students. In California, 4.1% of 7th graders, 5% of 9th graders, and 5.9% of 11th graders reported that they had been hit, slapped, or intentionally physically hurt by a girlfriend or boyfriend in the past 12 months, according to 2011-13 data. Experiencing intimate partner violence during the prenatal period is associated with poorer maternal and infant health. Non-traditional students (those enrolled in Community Day Schools or Continuation Education) had the highest percentages reporting relationship violence in the past year: 11.1% in 2011-13. Specifically, women who experience relationship violence during pregnancy are less likely to access prenatal care, and more likely to have insufficient weight gain, miscarry, give birth prematurely, and have infants with low birth weight or injuries (7). Child exposure to parental violence and psychological distress associated with delayed milestones. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Prevention Institute. Greater percentages of males in 7th, 9th, and 11th grades reported experiencing dating violence than their female peers in 2011-13. Women who experience relationship violence during pregnancy also have elevated stress levels, increased rates of smoking, and are at an increased risk for substance use, which are associated with poor maternal and infant health and well-being (8). Among racial/ethnic groups, higher percentages of American Indian/Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and African American/Black students reported relationship violence than students in other groups. Dating violence among teens also is a major public health problem in the U. In 2009, a staggering 18.5% of Chicago youth surveyed reported that they had been hit, slapped or physically hurt on purpose by a boyfriend or girlfriend.