Eventually people lost interest as BBSs lost out to the World Wide Web, and Matchmaker was superseded by

Like the rest of America, Philadelphia left the stability of the 1950s for a radically different era.

While looking at these ads, I urge you think about the ads you see today. Are kitchen appliances still marketed to only women?

Since the earliest days of mass media and technology, people have been finding ways to broadcast their desires and find connections that might have otherwise eluded them.

I mean, one could argue that even Voyager 1's Golden Record is kind of a massive, interstellar personal ad (complete with the recorded sound of a kiss! It's as if humanity decided to document all our best features and send them into space with this message: So dating apps are really the latest manifestation of human beings doing what we've always done -- create new tools to communicate and then turn around and use those tools to find love, sex and companionship.

The Cold War ramped up, troops were sent to Vietnam, hippies emerged with drugs and rock. Through it all, advertising provided a bit of calmness amid the tumult.

It was, however, quite the moment for print ads, which could step up their game thanks to the fast-moving technology it was trumpeting and changing times.

1695: The First Personal Ads According to history professor H. Cocks (seriously --The Best Name Ever for an academic) personal ads began as a way to help British bachelors find eligible wives.

One of the earliest personals ever placed was by a 30-year-old man, with "a very good estate', announcing he was in search of 'some good young gentlewoman that has a fortune of £3,000 or thereabouts." (£3,000 is equivalent to roughly £300,000 today.

But these hyperbolic pronouncements miss a deeper fact: At its core, "online dating" isn't something we just started doing 5, 10 or even 20 years ago.

Before the Internet, there were personal ads, and before that, lonely shepherds carved detailed works of art into tree bark to communicate their longing for human contact.

There were also apparently other video dating services like Teledate and Introvision, but it's nearly impossible to find anything about them online. A bulletin board system for romance started by Jon Boede and Scott Smith.